John V. Schloss, PhD

John V. Schloss, PhD

Chair of Pharmaceutical Science/Associate Dean of Research

Education

BS (University of Tulsa, 1973), PhD (University of Tennessee-Knoxville/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1978), NIH Postdoctoral Fellow-University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1978-81

Bio

Dr. Schloss brings a perspective on pharmacy education to AUHS based on 10 years as a professional scientist in DuPont’s Central Research Department; 9 years as Professor at the University of Kansas, School of Pharmacy; 6 years in pharmacy-related biotech; and 10 years helping to build the basic science and research components of two domestic and one foreign pharmacy programs. He has remained active in both research and the education of graduate and undergraduate students, while securing research funding from international, federal, state, and private sources. Dr. Schloss was an NIH-postdoctoral fellow at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and holds a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Tennessee for work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Dr. Suhui Yang

Suhui Yang, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Education

PhD, Chonnam National University, South Korea; MS Marine and Atmosphere Sciences, Stoney Brook University, NY; BS Oceanography (Major), Chemistry (Minor), Pukyong National University, South Korea.

Bio

Dr. Suhui Yang obtained her B.S. in Oceanography (major) and Chemistry (minor) from Pukyong National University, South Korea, in 2004 and her M.S. in Marine Chemistry from Stony Brook University, New York, in 2008. She later switched her interest to Medicinal Chemistry and earned her Ph.D. under the guidance of Prof. Won-Jea Cho from Chonnam National University, South Korea, in 2012. Her doctoral research was focused on the design and development of novel small molecule compounds targeting Androgen Receptor, Topoisomerase, or JAK/STAT pathway for treating cancers. In research, she used to apply computational techniques such as virtual screening or molecular docking, synthesize various chemical libraries, and optimize the active compounds.

Dr. Yang moved to the University of Michigan where she conducted research as postdoctoral fellow with Prof. Nouri Neamati, working on synthesis of bioactive small molecule compounds as anti-cancer agents (2013-2017). Dr. Yang joined the faculty of the American University of Health Sciences as an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, in August 2018. Her current research interests are the design and development of small molecule compounds as chemotherapeutic agents and the use of photoaffinity probes for identification of the molecular targets of small molecules.

Published Research

  1. Discovery and Mechanistic Elucidation of a Class of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Glioblastoma 2017
  2. Mechanistic Evaluation and Transcriptional Signature of a Glutathione S-Transferase Omega 1 Inhibitor 2016
  3. Structure-Based Discovery of Novel Cyclophilin A Inhibitors for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infections 2015
  4. Modification of 3-Arylisoquinolines Into 3,4-Diarylisoquinolines and Assessment of Their Cytotoxicity and Topoisomerase Inhibition 2015
  5. Computer-Aided Discovery of Aminopyridines as Novel JAK2 Inhibitors 2015
  6. Synthesis of Novel 5-Oxaprotoberberines as Bioisosteres of Protoberberines 2014
  7. Design, Synthesis and Systematic Evaluation of Cytotoxic 3-Heteroarylisoquinolinamines as Topoisomerases Inhibitors 2014
  8. SAR Based Design of Nicotinamides as a Novel Class of Androgen Receptor Antagonists for Prostate Cancer 2013
Dr. Amir Shirazi

Amir Shirazi, PharmD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Education

PharmD, Chapman University, CA; PhD, University of Rhode Island, RI; MSc in Organic Chemistry, Shiraz University, Iran; BSc Chemistry, Shiraz University, Iran.

Bio

Dr. Amir Shirazi serves as an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at American University of Health Sciences. He holds both Pharm.D. and Ph.D. degrees. He has received his Doctoral Degree in Pharmacy from Chapman University School of Pharmacy in 2018. During his Pharm.D. studies, he had opportunities to work at CVS retail stores, Kaiser Permanente Hospitals, and Saint Jude Heritage Medical Group.

Prior to joining the Pharm.D. program, Dr. Shirazi served as a Research Fellow at Chapman University, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, and was an Associate Member of the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at UC at Irvine Medical Center.

In addition to his Pharm.D. degree, he received a Doctoral Degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the University of Rhode Island in 2013. During his Ph.D. studies, he developed numerous drug delivery systems using peptide building blocks for various delivery applications. As a result of his research investigations, he was able to publish more than 50 research papers in prestigious journals in the field of pharmaceutical sciences which have been cited extensively by his peers.

Published Research

  1. Efficient Intracellular Delivery of Cell-Impermeable Cargo Molecules by Peptides Containing Tryptophan and Histidine 2018
  2. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Homochiral Peptides Containing Arginine and Histidine as Molecular Transporters 2018
  3. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of the Kinase Inhibition Potential of Pyridylpyrimidinylaminophenyl Derivatives 2017
  4. Cysteine and Arginine-Rich Peptides as Molecular Carriers 2016
  5. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Chitosan Conjugated GGRGDSK Peptides as a Cancer Cell-Targeting Molecular Transporter 2016
  6. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Dasatinib-Amino Acid and Dasatinib-Fatty Acid Conjugates as Protein Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors 2016
  7. Evaluation of Their Src Kinase Inhibitory and Antiproliferative Activities and Evaluation of Their Src Kinase Inhibitory and Antiproliferative Activities 2015
  8. Cationic Cell-Penetrating Peptides Are Potent Furin Inhibitors 2015
  9. Synthesis of 3-Arylidene and 3-Arylimine Oxindole Derivatives and Evaluation of Their Src Kinase Inhibitory and Antiproliferative Activities 2015
  10. Cyclic Peptide−Selenium Nanoparticles as Drug Transporters 2014
  11. Cyclic Peptide-Capped Gold Nanoparticles for Enhanced siRNA Delivery 2014
  12. Antibacterial Activities of Amphiphilic Cyclic Cell-Penetrating Peptides Against Multidrug Resistant Pathogens 2014
  13. Facile, Regio- and Diastereoselective Synthesis of Spiro-Pyrrolidine and Pyrrolizine Derivatives and Evaluation of Their Antiproliferative Activities 2014
  14. Enhanced Cellular Uptake of Short Polyarginine Peptides Through Fatty Acylation and Cyclization 2014
  15. Amphiphilic Triazolyl Peptides: Synthesis and Evaluation as Nanostructures 2014
  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of c-Src Kinase Inhibitory Activity of Pyridin-2(1H)-one Derivatives 2014
  17. Synthesis of 4-Aryl-6-Indolylpyridine-3-Carbonitriles and Evaluation of Their Antiproliferative Activity 2014
  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of Antiproliferative Activity of Substituted N-(9-Oxo-9H-Xanthen-4-Yl) Benzenesulfonamides 2014
  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of Antiproliferative Activity of Substituted N-(9-Oxo-9H-Xanthen-4-Yl)Benzenesulfonamides 2014
  20. Amphiphilic Bicyclic Peptides as Cellular Delivery Agents 2014
  21. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Benzimidazole Derivatives 2014
  22. Benzimidazoles as New Scaffold of Sirtuin Inhibitors: Green Synthesis, in Vitro Studies, Molecular Docking Analysis and Evaluation of Their Anti-Cancer Properties 2014
  23. Self-Assembly of Peptides to Nanostructures 2014
  24. Synthesis of Novel Ciprofloxacin Analogues and Evaluation of Their Anti-Proliferative Effect on Human Cancer Cell Lines 2013
  25. Self-Assembled Surfactant Cyclic Peptide Nanostructures as Stablizing Agents 2013
  26. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activities of Quebecol and its Analogs 2013
  27. Copper Triflate-Mediated Synthesis of 1,3,5-Triarylpyrazoles in [Bmim][PF6] Ionic Liquid and Evaluation of Their Anticancer Activities 2013
  28. Peptide-Amphiphile Containing Arginine and Fatty Acyl Chains as Molecule Transporters 2013
  29. Synthesis and Antiproliferative and C-Src Kinase Inhibitory Activities of Cinnamoyl- and Pyranochromen-2-One Derivatives 2013
  30. Efficient Delivery of Cell Impermeable Phosphopeptides by a Cyclic Peptide Amphiphile Containing Tryptophan and Arginine 2013
  31. Design and Biological Evaluation of Cell-Penetrating Peptide−Doxorubicin Conjugates as Prodrugs 2013
  32. Cyclic Peptide-Capped Gold Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Systems 2013
  33. Synthesis and Antiproliferative and C-Src Kinase Inhibitory Activities of Cinnamoyl- and Pyranochromen-2-One Derivatives 2013
  34. Synthesis and Characterization of Some New Aromatic Polytriazoles as Proton Conductive Membranes 2013
  35. Surface Decorated Gold Nanoparticles by Linear and Cyclic 2013
  36. Cyclic Peptides Containing Tryptophan and Arginine as Src kinase inhibitors 2013
Hugo Arias

Hugo Arias, PhD, MS, BS

Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Education

PhD in Biochemistry, National Southern University, Argentina.

Bio

Hugo Arias obtained his Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1999 from National Southern University, Argentina. His Thesis was based on nicotinic receptors, developing this topic further in the following years. After his Thesis, Dr. Arias obtained a post-doc position at University of California, Riverside (1992-94), supported by a CONICET (National Scientific and Technical Research Council, Argentina) fellowship. When he returned to Argentina in 1994, Dr. Arias was appointed Assistant Investigator at CONICET, and subsequently promoted to Associate Investigator in 1999.

Research Areas of Interest

During 1999-02, he was a senior post-doc at Texas Teach University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock. In 2002, he obtained a Research Faculty position at University of Florida, Gainesville, and soon after he was appointed Assistant Professor at Western University Health Science, Pomona, CA. In 2007, Dr. Arias was promoted to Associate Professor at Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ. In 2012, he was promoted to Professor of Pharmacology and Biochemistry at California Northstate University College of Medicine, Elk Grove, and appointed Assistant Dean of Research in 2014. Dr. Arias is currently Professor in the proposed School of Pharmacy, American University of Health Sciences, teaching the courses “Pharmacology and Toxicology” and “Pharmacogenomics and Genetics”.

Dr. Arias started working on structural, functional, and neuropharmacological aspects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in 1983. He has amassed an impressive number of publications (>125), including peer reviewed papers, reviews, and book chapters, on this topic. His current focus is centred on neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases of high socioeconomic impact, including drug (and nicotine) addiction, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and cognitive dysfunctions. More particularly, I am interested in elucidating the role of different AChR subtypes in the underlying mechanisms of these conditions to further design novel ligands with high receptor selectivity for therapeutic translational opportunities. During the development of these projects, he had the opportunity of mentoring >100 undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate students from different programs in my lab as well as to advise students in their Master Theses, emphasizing his commitment with mentoring students in research. His collaborative mind opened the door for scientific collaborations with laboratories around the world, including laboratories from Italy, France, Austria, Poland, Hungary, Australia, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and USA. These scientific collaborations gave their fruits not only in terms of high impact publications, but also in extramural funds for the total sum of ~$1,500,000 in the last years.

Published Research

  • Wadenberg, M-L.G., Manetti, D., Romanelli, M.N., and Arias, H.R. (2017) Significance of the nicotinic α7 receptor in cognition and antipsychotic-like behavior in the rat. Behav. Brain Res. 333, 129-134.
  • Uspenska, K., Lykhmus, O., Gergalova, G., Chernyshov, V., Arias, H.R., Komisarenko, S., and Skok, M. (2017) Nicotine facilitates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor targeting to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to selective ligands. Neurosci. Lett. 656, 43-50.
  • Arias, H.R., Jin, X., Feuerbach, D., and Drenan, R.M. (2017) Selectivity of coronaridine congeners at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inhibitory activity on mouse medial habenula. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 92, 202-209.
  • Arias, H.R., Lykhmus, O., Uspenska, K., and Skok, M. (2018) Coronaridine congeners modulate mitochondrial α3β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with different potency and through distinct intra-mitochondrial pathways. Neurochem. Int. 114, 26-32.
  • Targowska-Duda, K.M., Kaczor, A.A., Jozwiak, K., and Arias, H.R. (2018) Molecular interactions of type I and type II positive allosteric modulators with the human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: an in silico study. J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. (29 pages) https://doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2018.1427634.
  • Arias, H.R., Feuerbach, D., and Ortells, M. (2018) Bupropion and (±)-SADU-3-72 inhibit human α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by luminal and non-luminal interactions. Neurotransmitter 5, e1631 (11 pages), doi: 10.14800/nt.1631.
  • Arias, H.R., Feuerbach, D., Schmidt, B., Heydenreich, M., Paz, C., and Ortells, M.O. (2018) Drimane sesquiterpenoids noncompetitively inhibit human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with higher potency compared to human α3β4 and α7 subtypes. J. Nat. Prod. 81(4), 811-817. doi: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00893.
  • Uspenska, K., Lykhmus, O., Arias, H.R., Pons, S., Maskos, U., Komisarenko, S., and Skok, M. (2018) Positive allosteric modulators of α7* or β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors trigger different kinase pathways in mitochondria. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 99, 226-235. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2018.04.018.
  • Arias, H.R., Vázquez-Gómez, E., Hernández-Abrego, A., Gallino, S., Feuerbach, D., Ortells, M.O., Elgoyhen A.B., and García-Colunga, J. (2018) Tricyclic antidepressants inhibit hippocampal α7* and α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by different mechanisms. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 100, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2018.04.017.
  • Targowska-Duda, K.M., Budzynska, B., Michalak, A., Jozwiak, K., Biała, G., and Arias, H.R. (2018) 3-Furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide, a highly selective positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic receptors, reduces anxiety-like behavior in mice. J. Psychopharmacol., in press, DOI: 10.1177/0269881118821100.h
Latifur Rahman

Latifur Rahman, MBBS

Assistant Professor, Medicine/Anatomy and Physiology

Education

MBBS (equivalent to US MD) (Chittagong Medical College, 1983), Surgical Intern (Chittagong Medical College, 1983-84), MS (Bangladesh Institute of Child Health,1991), Resident Medical Officer Dhaka Children’s Hospital, 1984-91, Attendant of Pediatric Surgical Unit Dhaka Children’s Hospital, 1991-93, Basic Life Support CPR Instructor American Heart Association, 2009-present

Bio

Dr. Rahman has been a faculty member at AUHS since 2016 where he currently teaches Anatomy & Physiology as part of the general education prerequisite for nursing students.

Since 2007, Dr. Rahman has been teaching Anatomy & Physiology as a senior and adjunct faculty member at local career and community colleges. He enjoys teaching because it allows him to share his knowledge and experience with students starting off in healthcare and has given him the opportunity to return to the field he has been devoted to. Dr. Rahman also brings experience from his medical background to AUHS. In Bangladesh, Dr. Rahman attended Chittagong Medical College where he obtained his MBBS ( MD equivalent) and later worked as a surgical intern. Dr. Rahman further specialized in Pediatric Surgery for which he obtained a MS (1991) from the Bangladesh Institute of Child Health at Dhaka University. After working as a Resident Medical Officer at Dhaka Children’s Hospital (1984-1991), Dr. Rahman soon became Attendant of the Pediatric Surgical Unit at this institution. In this capacity, Dr. Rahman was responsible for training and teaching resident medical officers’ skills pertaining to bedside medicine and surgery.

During his free time, Dr. Rahman likes to spend time with his family, garden, and stay busy with home improvement projects. Dr. Rahman was also an instructor for Basic Life Support and CPR training through the American Heart Association from 2009-2016. He is also an active member of a local philanthropic organization where he educates members on relevant healthy living topics.