John V. Schloss, PhD

John V. Schloss, PhD

Chair of Pharmaceutical Science/Associate Dean of Research, Professor

Education

BS (University of Tulsa, 1973), PhD (University of Tennessee-Knoxville/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1978), NIH Postdoctoral Fellow-University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1978-81

Bio

Dr. Schloss brings a perspective on pharmacy education to AUHS based on 10 years as a professional scientist in DuPont’s Central Research Department; 9 years as Professor at the University of Kansas, School of Pharmacy; 6 years in pharmacy-related biotech; and 10 years helping to build the basic science and research components of two domestic and one foreign pharmacy programs. He has remained active in both research and the education of graduate and undergraduate students, while securing research funding from international, federal, state, and private sources. Dr. Schloss was an NIH-postdoctoral fellow at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and holds a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Tennessee for work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mohammed A. Islam

Mohammed A. Islam, PhD, RPh

Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor

Education

PhD and MPhil (Toyama University, Japan) and BS and MS in Pharmacy (University of Dhaka, Bangladesh)

Bio

Dr. Islam currently serves as the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the American University of Health Sciences (AUHS) School of Pharmacy. Dr. Islam has more than 20 years of academic research, teaching, pharmacy practice, and administrative experiences. Prior to joining AUHS in February 2019, he served as Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Pharmacology at West Coast University School of Pharmacy.

Dr. Islam went to Toyama University in Japan where he earned MPhil and PhD degrees in Pharmaceutical Sciences. He earned his master’s and bachelor’s degrees in pharmacy from the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Dr. Islam has extensive research experience with more than 65 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference abstracts. His current research interests include pharmacy curriculum, global pharmacy education, and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Dr. Islam’s research has been published in leading pharmacy education journals and presented at national and international conferences.

Published Research

  • Islam MA, Khan SA, Gunaseelan, S, Talukder R. Physician Perceptions of Integrating Pharmacists into Healthcare in Bangladesh. J Pharm Pract and Res (2018)https://doi.org/10.1002/jppr.1401
  • Islam MA, Sabnis G, Farris F. The trilayer approach of teaching physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology concepts in a first-year pharmacy course: the TLAT model. Adv Physiol Educ. 2017 Sep 1;41(3):395-404, 2017.
  • Islam MA, Talukder R, Taheri R, and Blanchard, N. Integration of basic and clinical science courses in US PharmD programs. Am J Pharm Educ. 80 (10) Article 166, 2016.
  • Islam MA, Khan SA, Talukder RM. Status of Physiology Education in US Doctor of Pharmacy programs. Adv Physiol Educ. 2016 Dec; 40(4):501-508,
  • Islam MA, Chen G, and Talukder RM. Specialty Tracks in PharmD Curricula of US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. 8(6):774-781, 2016.
  • Islam MA, Khan SA, Gunaseelan S, and Talukder RM. Specialty education for student pharmacists and PharmD graduates in US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. 8:184-190,
  • Islam MA and Schweiger TA. Students’ Perception of an Integrated Approach of Teaching Entire Sequence of Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Pharmacotherapeutics Courses in PharmD Curriculum. Journal of Pharmacy Practice.  28(2):220-6, 2015.
  • Islam MA, Gunaseelan S, Talukder RM, Khan S. Current Challenges in Pharmacy Education in Bangladesh: A Roadmap for the Future. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. 6:730–735, 2014.
  • Islam MA, Gunaseelan S, Khan SA. A Research Elective Course on Dietary Supplements to Engage PharmD Students in Primary Literature Evaluation and Scholarly Activity. Journal of Pharmacy Practice 1-8 DOI: 10.1177/0897190013516510; 2014.
  • Islam MA, Schmidt RW, Gunaseelan S, Sanchez A. An Update on the Cardiovascular Effects of Quercetin, a Plant Flavonoid. Current Nutrition & Food Science 10:36-48, 2014.
  • Islam MA, Schmidt RW, Gunaseelan S, Sanchez A. An Update on the Cardiovascular Effects of Quercetin, a Plant Flavonoid. Current Nutrition & Food Science 10:36-48, 2014.
  • Islam MA. An Elective Course on the Basic and Clinical Sciences Aspects of Vitamins and Minerals. Am J Pharm Educ77: Article 17. 2013.
  • Downing L and Islam MA (corresponding author).The Use of Calcium Supplements and Cardiovascular Adverse Effects: An Update. Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 70:1132-1139, 2013.
  • Islam MA. Cardiovascular effects of green tea catechins: progress and promise. Recent Patents on Cardiovascular Drug Discovery 7: 88-99, 2012.
  • Islam MA. Soy Isoflavones and Cardiovascular Health: An Update. Current Nutrition and Food Science 7:108-121, 2011.
  • Islam MA. Pharmacological Modulations of Cardiac Ultra-rapid and Slowly Activating Delayed Rectifier Currents: Potential Antiarrhythmic Approaches. Recent Patents on Cardiovascular Drug Discovery, 5: 33-46, 2010.
  • DeSantiago J, Islam MA,Ziolo MT, Bers DM, and Pogwizd SM: Arrhythmogenic effects of beta2-adrenergic stimulation in the failing heart are due to enhanced SR Ca load. Circulation Research,
  • Despa S, Islam MA, Pogwizd SM, Bers DM: Intracellular [Na+] and Na+pump rate in rat and rabbit ventricular myocytes. J Physiol539: 133-143, 2002.
  • Despa S, Islam MA, Pogwizd SM, Bers DM: Intracellular Na+concentration is elevated in heart failure, but Na/K-pump function is unchanged. Circulation;105:2543-2548, 2002.
  • Kimura I, Islam MA, Ritsu H, Nojima H, Tezuka Y, and Zhao W: Blood pressure lowering, positive chronotropy and inotropy by the veratrum alkaloids germidine and germerine but negative chronotropy by veratridine in mice.   J Asian Natural Product Research, 2: 133-144, 2000.
  • Islam  MA, Nojima H, and Kimura I: Acetylcholne-induced biphasic effect on the maximum upstroke velocity of action potential in mouse isolated right atria: Interaction with b-adrenergic signaling cascade. Jpn J Pharmacol. 78: 181-190, 1998.
  • Islam MA, Nojima H, and Kimura I: Muscarinic M1receptor activation reducesmaximum upstroke velocity of action potential in mouse right atria. Eur J Pharmacol. 346: 227-236, 1998.
  • Chowdhury AKA, Islam MA, Rashid A, and Ferdous AJ: Therapeutic potential of the volatile oil of Nigellasativaseeds in monkey model with experimental shigellosis.  Phytotherapy Res. 12: 361-363, 1998.
  • Kimura I, Islam MA, Nojima H, Mizumoto J, Tezuka Y, Weijie Z: Blood pressure-lowering, positive chronotropic and inotropic effects of the veratrum alkaloids, germidine and germerine in mouse. J of Traditional Medicines, 15: 254-255, 1998.
  • Kimura I, Islam MA, and Kimura M: Potentiation by higenamine of the aconitine induced positive chronotropic effect in isolated right atria of mice: The effects of cholera toxin, forskolin and pertussis toxin. Biol Pharm Bull.  19: 1032-1037, 1996.
  • Kimura I, Islam MA, and Kimura M.: Cholera toxin accentuates the antagonism by acetylcholine of higenamine-induced positive chronotropy in isolated right atria of mice. Biol Pharm Bull.  18: 1509-11512, 1995.
  • Kimura I, Makino M, Takamura Y, Islam MA, and Kimura M: Positive chronotropic and inotropic effects of higenamine and its enhancing action on the aconitine-induced tachyarrhythmia in isolated murine atria. Jpn J Pharmacol. 66: 75-80, 1994.
  • Kimura I, Hata Y, Islam MA, and Kimura M: Diabetes mellitus-induced enhancement  of prostaglandin F2a-response is inhibited by lipoxygenase-but not cyclooxygenase-inhibitors in mesenteric veins and arteries of mouse and rat.  Jpn J Pharmacol. 64: 65-70, 1994.
  • Reza S, Khan OF, Islam MA, Rashid A, and Chowdhury AKA: In vitro antibacterial activity of Ipomoea fistulusa. Fitoterapia LXV: 465-466, 1994.
Sandor Szabo, MD

Sandor Szabo, MD, MSc, PhD, MPH, DSc (h.c.)

Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Education

MD, University of Belgrade Medical School
MSc, University of Montreal Medical Faculty
PhD, University of Montreal Medical Faculty
MPH, Harvard School of Public Health

Bio

Sandor Szabo, a Fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGAF), and an External Member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences: After finishing medical school in Belgrade, obtained MSc & PhD in the institute of Hans Selye (the ‘father of biologic stress’) at the University of Montreal & continued with pathology residency at Harvard Med Sch, Boston, where he became assistant & associate professor. He also obtained an MPH at Harvard School of Public Health, & after 20 years at Harvard, became a professor of pathology & pharmacology at the Medical School of University of California, Irvine (UCI), CA. He also served as chief of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine Service for 20 years, of which for 12 years also covered the functions of chief of staff at the VA Medical Center in Long Beach, CA, where he continued his productive research in the molecular mechanisms of stress-related diseases, esp., gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration. His laboratory was the first to publish easily reproducible, chemically induced duodenal ulcers & adrenal necrosis in rats. This was followed by structure-activity studies (SAS) with chemicals that induce duodenal ulcers which is the most frequent form of peptic ulcers in patients. These SAS led to the first recognition of dopamine in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulceration in animal models & man. Subsequently, he demonstrated for the first time the potent ulcer healing effect of angiogenic growth factors which on molar basis 2-7 million times more potent than antisecretory or anti-H. pylori drugs. His laboratory also published the first gene expression & gene therapy results in duodenal ulceration.

So far, he has 235 original, peer-review publications (several in the best scientific journals like Nature, Science, PNAS, BBRC, JAMA, Lancet, J. Clin. Invest., Lab. Invest., Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Am. J. Pathol., J. Pharm. Sci., J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.), 55 review articles, 37 book chapters, 5 books edited, & 241 invited lectures in North America, Europe, Asia & Australia as well as 9 approved patents, mostly for new GI ulcer drugs & one pending application. In teaching activities, he was course director for general pathology at Harvard Medical School & was teaching GI & endocrine pathology as well as courses in public health & toxicology at Harvard & UCI.

He was associate master at one of the 5 student academic societies at Harvard Medical School (i.e., at Peabody Society) & initiated the establishment of similar student academic societies at UCI to promote small-group teaching & flip classroom techniques. In 2013 he initiated the annual week-long international Summer Schools on Stress (https://www.stresseducation.org ) that has been held at various universities over the world, e.g., Hungary, Croatia, France, Slovakia, Japan & Russia.

Published Research

  • Selye H, Szabo S. Protection by various steroids against gold nephropathy. Eur. J. Toxicol. 1971; 4:512-516.
  • Szabo S, Selye H. Duodenal ulcers produced by propionitrile in rats. Arch. Pathol. 1972; 93:389-390.
  • Selye H, Szabo S, Kourounakis P. Protection against phenylisothiocyanate by various steroids, phenobarbital and diphenylhydantoin. J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1972; 24:333-334.
  • Selye H, Szabo S. Experimental model for production of perforating duodenal ulcers by cysteamine in the rat. Nature 1973; 244:458-459.
  • Szabo S, Selye H, Kourounakis P, Taché Y. Comparative studies on the effect of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and pregnenolone-16a-carbonitrile (PCN) upon drug response and distribution in rats. Biochem. Pharmacol. 1974; 23:2083-2094.
  • Kourounakis P, Szabo S, Selye H. Effect of various steroids and ACTH on the distribution of zoxazolamine in rats. J. Pharm. Sci. 1973; 62:1946-1949.
  • Szabo S, Kourounakis P, Selye H, Da Silva O. Pharmacodynamic interactions among gluco-, mineralo-, glucomineralocorticoids, pregnenolone-16a-carbonitrile and various drugs. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 1974; 188:45-54.
  • Szabo S, Komlos S, Ignjatovi_ Z. Effect of pregnenolone-16a-carbonitrile (PCN) on drug response in man. J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1975; 27:113-118.
  • Szabo S, Kourounakis P, Selye H. Influence of adrenocorticotropic hormone, somatotrophic hormone and pregnenolone-16a-carbonitrile on drug response and metabolism. Biochem. Pharmacol. 1975; 24:1549-1551.
  • Szabo S, Reynolds ES, Kovacs K. Animal model of human disease. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Animal model: acrylonitrile-induced adrenal apoplexy. Am. J. Pathol. 1976; 82:653-656.
  • Szabo S, Reynolds ES, Moslen MT. Chemical factors in aetiology of duodenal ulcer. Lancet 1975; 2:73.
  • Schwedes U, Usadel K, Szabo S. Somatostatin prevents cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 1977; 44:195-196.
  • Szabo S. Animal model of human disease. Duodenal ulcer disease. Animal model: cysteamine-induced acute and chronic duodenal ulcer in the rat. Am. J. Pathol. 1978; 93:273-276.
  • Szabo S, Bailey KA, Boor PJ, Jaeger RJ. Acrylonitrile and tissue glutathione: differential effect of acute and chronic interactions. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1977; 79:32-37.
  • Szabo S, Horvath E, Kovacs K, Larsen PR. Pyrazole-induced thyroid necrosis: a distinct organ lesion. Science 1978; 199:1209-1210.
  • Szabo S. Dopamine disorder in duodenal ulceration. Lancet 1979; 2:880-882.
  • Szabo S, Hüttner I, Kovacs K, Horvath E, Szabo D, Horner HC. Pathogenesis of experimental adrenal hemorrhagic necrosis (“apoplexy”). Ultrastructural, biochemical, neuropharmacologic and blood coagulation studies with acrylonitrile in the rat. Lab. Invest. 1980; 42:533-546.
  • Szabo S, Trier JS, Frankel PW. Sulfhydryl compounds may mediate cytoprotection. Science 1981; 214:200-202.
  • Szabo S, Reichlin S. Somatostatin depletion in rat organs: a novel effect of the potent duodenal ulcerogen, cysteamine. Endocrinology 1981; 109:2255-2257.
  • Szabo S, Reynolds ES, Unger SH. Structure-activity relations between alkyl nucleophilic chemicals causing duodenal ulcer and adrenocortical necrosis. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 1982; 223:68-76.
  • Palkovits M, Browstein MJ, Eiden LE, Beinfeld MC, Russell J, Arimura A, Szabo S. Selective depletion of somatostatin in rat brain by cysteamine. Brain Res. 1982, 240, 178-180.
  • Adler RS, Gallagher GT, Szabo S. Duodenal ulcerogens cysteamine and propionitrile decrease duodenal neutralization of acid in the rat. Dig. Dis. Sci. 1983; 28:716-723.
  • Neumeyer JL, Szabo S. (-)-10,11-Methylenedioxy-N-propylnoraporphine, an orally effective dopamine agonist and duodenal antiulcerogen in the rat. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 1983; 88:273-274.
  • Gallagher GT, Szabo S. Direct measurement of duodenal acid-pepsin exposure at site of ulceration in rats. Am. J. Physiol. 1984; 246: G660-G665.
  • Szabo S, Gallagher G, Horner HC, Frankel PW, Underwood RH, Konturek SJ, Brzozowski T, Trier JS. Role of the adrenal cortex in gastric mucosal protection by prostaglandins, sulfhydryls and cimetidine in the rat. Gastroenterology 1983; 85:1384-1390.
  • Szabo S, Trier JS, Brown A, Schnoor J. Early vascular injury and increased vascular permeability in gastric mucosal injury caused by ethanol in the rat. Gastroenterology 1985; 88:228-236.
  • Pihan G, Kline TJ, Hollenberg NK, Szabo S. Duodenal ulcerogens cysteamine and propionitrile induce gastroduodenal motility alterations in the rat. Gastroenterology 1985; 88:989-997.
  • Crum R, Szabo S, Folkman J. A new class of steroids inhibits angiogenesis in the presence of heparin or a heparin fragment. Science 1985; 230:1375-1378.
  • Szabo S, Brown A, Pihan G, Dali H, Neumeyer JL. Duodenal ulcer induced by MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine). Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 1985; 180:567-571.
  • Szabo S, Horner HC, Maull H, Schnoor J, Chieuh CC, Palkovits M. Biochemical changes in tissue catecholamines and serotonin in duodenal ulceration caused by cysteamine or propionitrile in the rat. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 1987; 240:871-878.
  • Silver EH, Szabo S, Cahill M, Jaeger RJ. Time-course studies of the distribution of [1-14C] acrylonitrile in rats after intravenous administration. J. Appl. Toxicol. 1987; 7:303-306.
  • Szabo S, Rogers C. Diet, ulcer disease, and fish oil. Lancet 1988; 1:119.
  • Folkman J, Szabo S, Stovroff M. McNeil P, Li W, Shing Y. Duodenal ulcer: discovery of a new mechanism and development of angiogenic therapy that accelerates healing. Ann. Surg. 1991; 214:414-426.
  • Hauser J, Szabo S. Extremely long protection by pyrazole derivatives against chemically induced gastric mucosal injury. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther., 1991; 256:592-598.
  • Giampaolo C, Gray AT, Olshen RA, Szabo S. Predicting chemically induced duodenal ulcer and adrenal necrosis with classification trees. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1991; 88:6298-6302.
  • Szabo S, Folkman J, Vattay P, Morales RE, Pinkus GS, Kato K. Accelerated healing of duodenal ulcers by oral administration of a mutein of basic fibroblast growth factor in rats. Gastroenterology 1994; 106:1106-1111.
  • Nagy L, Kusstatscher S, Hauschka PV, Szabo S. Role of cysteine proteases and protease inhibitors in gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol or ammonia in the rat. J. Clin. Invest. 1996; 98:1047-1054.
  • Szabo S, Vincze A, Sandor Z, Jadus M, Gombo Z, Pedram A, Levin E, Hagar J, Iaquinto G. Vascular approach to gastroduodenal ulceration: new studies with endothelins and VEGF. Dig. Dis. Sci. 1998;4 3:40S-45S.
  • Khomenko T, Deng XM, Jadus MR, Szabo S. Effect of cysteamine on redox-sensitive thiol-containing proteins in the duodenal mucosa. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm. 2003;309:910-916.
  • Khomenko T, Deng XM, Sandor Zs, Tarnawski AS and S Szabo. Cysteamine alters redox state, HIF-1 transcriptional interactions and reduces duodenal mucosal oxygenation: novel insight into the mechanisms of duodenal ulceration Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 2004; 317(1):121-127.
  • Deng XD, Szabo S, Jadus MR, Khomenko T, Yoshida M, Herlyn M, Nesbit M, Matsumoto H, Florsheim WH. Gene therapy with naked DNA or adenoviral vector of VEGF or PDGF increases endogenous VEGF, PDGF and bFGF expression and accelerates chronic duodenal ulcer healing in rats. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 2004; 311:982-988.
  • Khomenko T, Szabo S, Deng XM, Jadus M, Ishikawa H, Osapay K, Sandor Zs, Chen L. Suppression of early growth response factor– 1 with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide aggravates experimental duodenal ulcers. Am. J. Physiol., Gastrointest. Liver Physiol., 2006; 290:1211-1218.
  • Sandor Zs, Deng XM, Khomenko T, Tarnawski AS, Szabo S. Altered angiogenic balance in ulcerative colitis: A key to impaired healing? Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 2006; 350:147-150.
  • Ozdemir V, Jamal MM, Osapay K, Jadus MR, Sandor Z, Hashemzadeh M, Szabo S. Cosegregation of gastrointestinal ulcers and schizophrenia in a large national inpatient discharge database: revisiting the “brain-gut axis” hypothesis in ulcer pathogenesis. J. Investig. Med. 2007; 55(6):315-20.
  • Deng X, Szabo S, Khomenko T, Jadus MR, Yoshida M, Chen L. Detection of duodenal ulcer-associated genes in rats. Dig. Dis. Sci. 2008; 53(2): 375-84.
  • Tolstanova G, Khomenko T, Deng XM, Chen L, Tarnawski A, Ahluwalia A, Szabo S, Sandor Z. Neutralizing anti-VEGF antibody reduces severity of experimental ulcerative colitis in rats. Direct evidence for the pathogenic role of VEGF. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 2009; 328:749-757.
  • Khomenko T, Szabo S, Deng XM, Ishikawa H, Anderson G J, McLaren GD. Role of iron in the pathogenesis of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulceration in rats. Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 2009; 296: G1277-1286.
  • Deng XM, Tolstanova G, Khomenko T, Chen LC, Tanarwski AS, Szabo S, Sandor Zs. Mesalamine restores angiogenic balance in experimental ulcerative colitis by reducing expression of endostatin and angiostatin: Novel molecular mechanism for mesalamine’s therapeutic action. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 2009; 331:1071-1078.
  • Tolstanova G, Deng XM, Khomenko T, Garg P, Paunovic B, Chen LC, Sitaraman SV, Shiloach J, Szabo S, Sandor Zs. Role of anti-angiogenic factor endostatin in the pathogenesis of experimental ulcerative colitis. Life Sci. 2011; 88: 74-81.
  • Florkiewicz RZ, Ahluwalia A, Sandor Z, Szabo S, Tarnawski AS. Gastric mucosal injury activates bFGF gene expression and triggers preferential translation of high molecular weight bFGF isoforms through CUG-initiated, non-canonical codons. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 2011; 409:494-499.
  • Deng XM, Szabo S, Khomenko T, Xiong XM, Sandor Zs, Osapay K, Jadus MR, Tolstanova G, Shiloach J, Chen L. Inappropriate angiogenic response as a novel mechanism of duodenal ulceration and impaired healing. Dig. Dis. Sci. 2011; 56:2792-801.
  • Tolstanova G, Deng XM, French S, Lungo W, Paunovic B, Khomenko T, Ahluwalia A, Kaplan T, Dacosta-Iyer M, Tarnawski A, Szabo S, Sandor Zs. Early endothelial damage and increased colonic vascular permeability in the development of experimental ulcerative colitis in rats and mice. Lab. Invest. 2012; 92:9-21.
  • Paunovic B, Deng XM, Khomenko T, Ahluwalia A, Tolstanova G, Tarnawski A, Szabo S, Sandor Z. Molecular mechanisms of bFGF effect on healing of ulcerative colitis in rats. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 2011; 339:430-437.
  • Khomenko T, Kolodney J, Pinto JT, McLaren GD, Deng X, Chen L, Tolstanova G, Paunovic B, Krasnikov BF, Hoa N, Cooper AJ, Szabo S. New mechanistic explanation for the localization of ulcers in the rat duodenum: role of iron and selective uptake of cysteamine. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 2012; 525:60-70.
  • Ahluwalia A, Jones MK, Deng XM, Sandor Zs, Szabo S, Andrzej S Tarnawski AS. An imbalance between VEGF and endostatin underlies impaired angiogenesis in gastric mucosa of aging rats. Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 2013; 305: G325-332.
  • Khomenko T, Deng X, Ahluwalia A, Tarnawski T, Khushin P, Sandor Zs, Szabo S. STAT3 and importins are novel mediators of early molecular and cellular responses in experimental duodenal ulceration in rats and egr-1 knockout mice. Dig. Dis. Sci. 2014; 59:297-306.
  • Tolstanova G, Deng X, Ahluwalia A, Paunovic B, Prysiazhniuk A, Ostapchenko L, Tarnawski A, Sandor Z, Szabo S. Role of dopamine and D2 dopamine receptor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Dig. Dis. Sci. 2015; 60:2963-2975.
  • Satoh H, Szabo S. A mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor TGP-580 accelerates colonic ulcer healing by stimulating angiogenesis in the ulcer bed in rats. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 2015; 66:719-729.
  • Szabo S, Yoshida M, Filakovszky J, Juhasz Gy. “Stress” is 80 years old: From Hans Selye original paper in 1936 to recent advances in GI ulceration. Curr. Pharm. Des. 2017; 23:4029-4041.
  • Szabo S. New developments in cell & tissue injury: Focus on PD-1, C1orf106 gene, cell junctions & IBD. Dig. Dis. Sci. 2018 (in press)
Dr. Suhui Yang

Suhui Yang, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Education

PhD, Chonnam National University, South Korea; MS Marine and Atmosphere Sciences, Stoney Brook University, NY; BS Oceanography (Major), Chemistry (Minor), Pukyong National University, South Korea.

Bio

Dr. Suhui Yang obtained her B.S. in Oceanography (major) and Chemistry (minor) from Pukyong National University, South Korea, in 2004 and her M.S. in Marine Chemistry from Stony Brook University, New York, in 2008. She later switched her interest to Medicinal Chemistry and earned her Ph.D. under the guidance of Prof. Won-Jea Cho from Chonnam National University, South Korea, in 2012. Her doctoral research was focused on the design and development of novel small molecule compounds targeting Androgen Receptor, Topoisomerase, or JAK/STAT pathway for treating cancers. In research, she used to apply computational techniques such as virtual screening or molecular docking, synthesize various chemical libraries, and optimize the active compounds.

Dr. Yang moved to the University of Michigan where she conducted research as postdoctoral fellow with Prof. Nouri Neamati, working on synthesis of bioactive small molecule compounds as anti-cancer agents (2013-2017). Dr. Yang joined the faculty of the American University of Health Sciences as an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, in August 2018. Her current research interests are the design and development of small molecule compounds as chemotherapeutic agents and the use of photoaffinity probes for identification of the molecular targets of small molecules.

Published Research

  • S. Yang, A. Shergalis, D. Lu, A. Kyani, Z. Lu, M. Ljungman, N. Neamati, “Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel Allosteric Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitors”, J. Med. Chem., just accepted.
  • A. Kyani, S. Tamura, S. Yang (co-first), A. Shergalis, S. Samanta, Y. Kuang, M. Ljungman, N. Neamati, “Discovery and Mechanistic Elucidation of a Class of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Glioblastoma”, Chem. Med. Chem., (2018), 13, 164.
  • K. Ramkumar, S. Samanta, A. Kyani, S. Yang, S. Tamura, L. Ziemke, J. Stuckey, S. Li, K. Chinnaswamy, H. Otake, B. Debnath, V. Yarovenko, J. Sebolt-Leopold, M. Ljungman, N. Neamati, “Mechanistic evaluation and transcriptional signature of a Glutathione S-transferase Omega 1 inhibitor”, Nature Comm., (2016), 7, 13084.
  • S. Yang, J. K. R., S. Lim, T. G. Choi, J.-H. Kim, S. Akter, M. Jang, H.-J. Ahn, H.-Y. Kim, M. P. Windisch, D. B. Khadka, C. Zhao, Y. Jin, I. Kang, J. Ha, B.-C. Oh, M. Kim, S. S. Kim, W.-J. Cho, “Structure-Based Discovery of Novel Cyclophilin A Inhibitors for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infections”, J. Med. Chem., (2015), 58 (24), 9546-9561.
  • C. Zhao, S. H. Yang, D. B. Khadka, Y. Jin, K.T. Lee, W.-J. Cho, “Computer-aided discovery of aminopyridines as novel JAK2 inhibitors”, Bioorg. Med. Chem., (2015), 23, 985-995.
  • D. B. Khadka, H. Woo, S. H. Yang, C. Zhao, Y. Jin, T. N. Le, Y. Kwon, W.-J. Cho, “Modification of 3-arylisoquinolines into 3,4-diarylisoquinolines and assessment of their cytotoxicity and topoisomerase inhibition”, Eur. J, Med. Chem., (2015), 92, 583-607.
  • H. T. M. Van, H. M. Jeong, D. B. Khadka, S. H. Yang, C. Zhao, Y. Jin, K. Y. Lee, Y. Kwon, W.-J. Cho, “Design, synthesis and systematic evaluation of cytotoxic 3-heteroarylisoquinolinamines as topoisomerases inhibitors”, Eur. J, Med. Chem., (2014), 82, 181-194.
  • 8. Y. Jin, D. B. Khadka, S. H. Yang, C. Zhao, W.-J. Cho, “Synthesis of novel 5-oxaprotoberberines as bioisosteres of protoberberines”, Tetrahedron Lett., (2014), 55, 1366-1369.
  • 9. S. H. Yang, C.-H. Song, H. T. M. Van, E. Park, D. B. Khadka, E.-Y. Gong, K. Lee, and W.-J. Cho, “SAR Based Design of Nicotinamides as a Novel Class of Androgen Receptor Antagonists for Prostate Cancer”, J. Med. Chem., (2013), 56, (8), 3414-3418.
  • 10. C.-H. Song, S. H. Yang (co-first), E. Park, S. H. Cho, Eun-Yeung Gong, D. B. Khadka, W.-J. Cho, and K. Lee, “Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Identification of a Novel AR Antagonist”, J. Biol. Chem., (2012), 287 (36), 30769-30780.
Hugo Arias

Hugo Arias, PhD, MS, BS

Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Education

PhD in Biochemistry, Master of Science in Biochemistry, and Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, National Southern University, Argentina.

Bio

Hugo Arias obtained his Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1990 from National Southern University, Argentina. His Thesis was based on nicotinic receptors, developing this topic further in the following years. After his Thesis, Dr. Arias obtained a post-doc position at University of California, Riverside (1992-94), supported by a CONICET (National Scientific and Technical Research Council, Argentina) fellowship. When he returned to Argentina in 1994, Dr. Arias was appointed Assistant Investigator at CONICET, and subsequently promoted to Associate Investigator in 1999.

During 1999-02, he was a senior post-doc at Texas Teach University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock. In 2002, he obtained a Research Faculty position at University of Florida, Gainesville, and soon after he was appointed Assistant Professor at Western University Health Science, Pomona, CA. In 2007, Dr. Arias was promoted to Associate Professor at Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ. In 2012, he was promoted to Professor of Pharmacology and Biochemistry at California Northstate University College of Medicine, Elk Grove, and appointed Assistant Dean of Research in 2014. Dr. Arias is currently Professor of Pharmaceutical Science in the proposed School of Pharmacy, American University of Health Sciences.

Dr. Arias started working on structural, functional, and neuropharmacological aspects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in 1983. He has amassed an impressive number of publications (>125), including peer reviewed papers, reviews, and book chapters, on this topic. His current focus is centred on neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases of high socioeconomic impact, including drug (and nicotine) addiction, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and cognitive dysfunctions. More particularly, I am interested in elucidating the role of different AChR subtypes in the underlying mechanisms of these conditions to further design novel ligands with high receptor selectivity for therapeutic translational opportunities. During the development of these projects, he had the opportunity of mentoring >100 undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate students from different programs in my lab as well as to advise students in their Master Theses, emphasizing his commitment with mentoring students in research. His collaborative mind opened the door for scientific collaborations with laboratories around the world, including laboratories from Italy, France, Austria, Poland, Hungary, Australia, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and USA.

Published Research

  • Wadenberg, M-L.G., Manetti, D., Romanelli, M.N., and Arias, H.R. (2017) Significance of the nicotinic α7 receptor in cognition and antipsychotic-like behavior in the rat. Behav. Brain Res. 333, 129-134.
  • Uspenska, K., Lykhmus, O., Gergalova, G., Chernyshov, V., Arias, H.R., Komisarenko, S., and Skok, M. (2017) Nicotine facilitates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor targeting to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to selective ligands. Neurosci. Lett. 656, 43-50.
  • Arias, H.R., Jin, X., Feuerbach, D., and Drenan, R.M. (2017) Selectivity of coronaridine congeners at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inhibitory activity on mouse medial habenula. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 92, 202-209.
  • Arias, H.R., Lykhmus, O., Uspenska, K., and Skok, M. (2018) Coronaridine congeners modulate mitochondrial α3β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with different potency and through distinct intra-mitochondrial pathways. Neurochem. Int. 114, 26-32.
  • Targowska-Duda, K.M., Kaczor, A.A., Jozwiak, K., and Arias, H.R. (2018) Molecular interactions of type I and type II positive allosteric modulators with the human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: an in silico study. J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. (29 pages) https://doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2018.1427634.
  • Arias, H.R., Feuerbach, D., and Ortells, M. (2018) Bupropion and (±)-SADU-3-72 inhibit human α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by luminal and non-luminal interactions. Neurotransmitter 5, e1631 (11 pages), doi: 10.14800/nt.1631.
  • Arias, H.R., Feuerbach, D., Schmidt, B., Heydenreich, M., Paz, C., and Ortells, M.O. (2018) Drimane sesquiterpenoids noncompetitively inhibit human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with higher potency compared to human α3β4 and α7 subtypes. J. Nat. Prod. 81(4), 811-817. doi: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00893.
  • Uspenska, K., Lykhmus, O., Arias, H.R., Pons, S., Maskos, U., Komisarenko, S., and Skok, M. (2018) Positive allosteric modulators of α7* or β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors trigger different kinase pathways in mitochondria. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 99, 226-235. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2018.04.018.
  • Arias, H.R., Vázquez-Gómez, E., Hernández-Abrego, A., Gallino, S., Feuerbach, D., Ortells, M.O., Elgoyhen A.B., and García-Colunga, J. (2018) Tricyclic antidepressants inhibit hippocampal α7* and α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by different mechanisms. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 100, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2018.04.017.
  • Targowska-Duda, K.M., Budzynska, B., Michalak, A., Jozwiak, K., Biała, G., and Arias, H.R. (2018) 3-Furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide, a highly selective positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic receptors, reduces anxiety-like behavior in mice. J. Psychopharmacol., in press, DOI: 10.1177/0269881118821100.h

Albert Nguessan Ngo, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Education

PhD University of Missouri Kansas-City, MO, USA
BS, National Polytechnic Felix Houphouet Boigny, Yamoussoukro, Ivory Coast

Bio

Dr. Ngo serves as an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at American University of Health Sciences. He holds both a B.S and a PhD degree. He received his doctoral degree in pharmaceutical Science from University of Missouri-Kansas City in May 2018 (UMKC). He also worked at UMKC as a postdoctoral research associate. During his years at UMKC, Dr. Ngo developed skills in analytical chemistry, pharmaceutical data analysis, pharmaceutics, engineering material science, and biotechnology.

In addition, Dr. Ngo conducted research in drug delivery system such as development of a topical anti-HIV/AIDS microbicide. He also developed a safe, versatile oral drug delivery system for poorly water-soluble drugs. For this, he obtained a United State utility patent. Dr. Ngo has volunteered as an American Association Pharmaceutical Scientist (AAPS) abstract screener since 2017. In addition, Dr Ngo received many travel awards to present his work at international meetings. Dr. Ngo published 4 first authored articles including 3 peer reviewed research articles.

Published Research

  • Ngo AN, Ezoulin MJ, Youm I, & Youan BB (2014) Optimal Concentration of 2,2,2-Trichloroacetic Acid for Protein Precipitation Based on Response Surface Methodology. J Anal Bioanal. Tech. 5(4).
  • Ngo AN, Ezoulin MJ, Murowchick JB, Gounev AD, & Youan BB (2016) Sodium Acetate Coated Tenofovir-Loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles for Improved Physico-Chemical Properties. Pharm Res 33(2):367-383
  • Patent, Inventors, Ngo NA, Bi-Botti C. Youan; Formulation for pharmaceutical agents, European patent (WO2016201213A1) and, U.S. patent, PCT US2016/036871, Application#62/173,772
  • Ngo AN, Danielle Thomas, James Murowchick, Navid J. Ayon, Archana Jaiswal, Bi-Botti “Celestin” Youan1Engineering Fast Dissolving Sodium Acetate Mediated Crystalline Solid Dispersion of Docetaxel (Accepted in, International Journal of Pharmaceutics 04/20/2018)

Research and Areas of Interest
Develop Oral Delivery System for Therapeutic Macromolecules (e.g. Proteins and Nucleic Acid).
Extraction/ Synthesis of New Chemical Entities from Natural Plants for Cancer Therapies
Conduct research on homeless Empowering Learning Program, a health education and intervention program

Sukhwinder S. Lakhman, PhD

Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Education

B.Sc. (Medical), B.Ed., M.Sc. (Life Sciences), M.Phil. (Neuropharmacology), Ph.D. (Neurosciences) Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India.

Bio

Dr. Lakhman has more than 15 years of experience in academic, research and teaching in different schools of pharmacy. After earning his Ph. D. degree from Guru Nanak Dev University, he started working as postdoctoral fellow and later as Instructor/ Research Scientist in the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. During his tenure at SUNY Buffalo he worked in different areas of Pharmaceutical Sciences. He has also worked in and was a founding faculty of D’Youville College School of Pharmacy prior to joining American University of Health Sciences.

He is reviewer of various peer review Journals such a Pharmacogenomics, Pharmaceutical Research, Biogerontology, etc. He has research expertise in the various area such as Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamics, Molecular Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics as is apparent from his peer reviewed publications. And has published more than 25 research articles in prestigious journals like Pharmacogenomics, Molecular Pharmacology, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Drug metabolism and Disposition, Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Brain research etc. He extends is role beyond teacher to serve as volunteer member in Clean air Coalition, Worked as volunteer in a soap kitchen- “Friends of the Night”, Volunteer in the Great Lakes Consortium etc.

Published Research

  • Kaur , T., Manchanda, S., Lakhman, S.S. and Kaur, G. (2016). Efficacy of anti-epileptic drugs in treatment of Tumor and its associated Epilepsy: An in vitro Perspective. Annals of Neurosciences 23 (1): 33-43.
  • Singh,R., Lakhanpa, D., Manchanda, S., Kuma, S., Kaur,T., Lakhman, S.S. and Kaur, G. (2015). Middle age on set short-term intermittent fasting dietary restriction prevents brain function impairments. Biogerontology 16(6) : 775 – 88.
  • Kaur, G. and Lakhman, S. (2012). Dietary restrictions as a potential intervention to retard age-associated impairments of brain functions. This is in: Thakur, M.K. and Rattan, S.I.S (ed’s) Brain Aging and Therapeutic Interventions, New York, NY. Springer Press.
  • Lakhman, S. S., Ma, Qing and Morse, G.D., (2009). Pharmacogenomics of CYP3A: Considerations for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Treatment. (Review article) Pharmacogenomics (Future medicine) 10(8):1323- 1339.
  • Lakhman, S. S. Chen, X., Gonzalez, V.M., Schuetz, E. G and Blanco, J.G. (2007) Functional characterization of the promoter of human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1). Role of XRE elements in mediating the induction of CBR1 by ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Molecular Pharmacology 72(3): 734-43.
  • Gonzalez, V.M., Ghosh, D., Lakhman, S. S., Pendyala, L., and Blanco, J.G. (2007). A functional genetic polymorphism on human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1 V88I) impacts on catalytic activity and NADPH binding affinity. Drug Metabolism Disposition 35(6):973-80.
  • Gonzalez, V.M., Lakhman, S. S., Ghosh, D., Pendyala, L., and Blanco, J.G. (2006). Functional characterization of a Non-synonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Human carbonyl Reductase 1 CBR1V88I). AAPS Pharm Sc, 8(S2):1322.
  • Gonzalez, V.M., Lakhman, S. S., Forrest, A., Relling, M. V., and Blanco, J.G. (2006). Higher activity of polymorphic NAD(P)H:Quinone oxidoreductase in liver cytosols from blacks compared to whites. Toxicology Letters 164: 249-258.
  • Lakhman, S. S, Ghosh, D and Blanco, J.G., (2005). Functional Significance of a Natural Allelic Variant of Human Carbonyl Reductase 3 (CBR3). Drug Metabolism Disposition 33(2):254-257.
  • Bhattacharya, A., Lakhman, S.S. and Singh, S. (2004). Modulation of L-type calcium channels in Drosophila by Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP) mediated Pathway. J. Biological Chemistry 279 (36)3:7291-37297.
  • Chandrasekaran, E.V.,Lakhman, S. S., Chawda, R., Piskorz, C.F., Neelamegham, S and Matta,K.L., (2004) Identification of Physiologically Relevant Substrates for cloned Gal: 3-O-Sulfotransferases (Gal3STs) distinct high affinity of Gal3ST-2 and LS180, sulfotransferase for the GLOBO H backbone, Gal3ST-3 for N-Glycan MULTITERMINAL Galβ1,4GlcNAcβ units and 6- SULFO Galβ1,4GlcNAcβ,and Gal3ST-4 for the mucin core-2 Trisaccharide. J. Biological Chemistry 279 (11): 10032-10041.
Balwantsinh Chauhan, MD, PhD

Balwantsinh Chauhan, MD, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences

Education

BSc, MSc and PhD from Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Baroda, Guj., India
MD degree in 1998 from College of Medicine, Spartan Health Sciences University (Vieux- fort, St. Lucia, West Indies)

Bio

Dr. Chauhan’s PhD work was in the field of ‘reproductive endocrinology’. Dr. Chauhan became faculty (Asst. Lecturer) in 1970 at Department of Zoology (Faculty of Science, M.S. University, Baroda) and was promoted to “ Reader (Associate Professor) ” in 1983. He left for U.S.A. in 1987, and got involved in biomedical research, then worked as Laboratory Manager and Lab. Director with environmental toxicology analytical laboratories. Dr. Chauhan’s primary interest is teaching courses like human/clinical anatomy, neuroanatomy, human embryology, medical physiology, pathophysiology, microbiology/immunology, medical genetics and pharmacogenomics.

In past, he taught at college of medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC, Chicago, U.S.A.), SABA school of Medicine (SABA, West Indies) and college of pharmacy, Roosevelt university, (Schaumburg, Illinois). His teaching experience spans over more than twenty-five years. Dr. Chauhan’s current research interests include: (1) Pharmacognosy: Screening of Indian, Chinese and plants from USA for their bio-medical properties, (2) Obesity,(3) Pharmacogenomics, and (3) Dermal-Toxicology/melanoma. Dr. Chauhan has co-authored several peer-reviewed publications and scientific abstract/ posters; some of them received international merit awards. He is also serving as reviewer for scientific manuscripts in his field of expertise. He is also a member in few scientific associations.