John V. Schloss, PhD

John V. Schloss, PhD

Chair of Pharmaceutical Science/Associate Dean of Research

Education

BS (University of Tulsa, 1973), PhD (University of Tennessee-Knoxville/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1978), NIH Postdoctoral Fellow-University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1978-81

Bio

Dr. Schloss brings a perspective on pharmacy education to AUHS based on 10 years as a professional scientist in DuPont’s Central Research Department; 9 years as Professor at the University of Kansas, School of Pharmacy; 6 years in pharmacy-related biotech; and 10 years helping to build the basic science and research components of two domestic and one foreign pharmacy programs. He has remained active in both research and the education of graduate and undergraduate students, while securing research funding from international, federal, state, and private sources. Dr. Schloss was an NIH-postdoctoral fellow at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and holds a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Tennessee for work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mohammed A. Islam

Mohammed A. Islam, PhD, RPh

Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Education

PhD and MPhil (Toyama University, Japan) and BS and MS in Pharmacy (University of Dhaka, Bangladesh)

Bio

Dr. Islam currently serves as the Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the American University of Health Sciences (AUHS) School of Pharmacy. Dr. Islam has more than 20 years of academic research, teaching, pharmacy practice, and administrative experiences. Prior to joining AUHS in February 2019, he served as Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Pharmacology at West Coast University School of Pharmacy.

Dr. Islam went to Toyama University in Japan where he earned MPhil and PhD degrees in Pharmaceutical Sciences. He earned his master’s and bachelor’s degrees in pharmacy from the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Dr. Islam has extensive research experience with more than 65 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference abstracts. His current research interests include pharmacy curriculum, global pharmacy education, and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Dr. Islam’s research has been published in leading pharmacy education journals and presented at national and international conferences.

Published Research

  • Islam MA, Khan SA, Gunaseelan, S, Talukder R. Physician Perceptions of Integrating Pharmacists into Healthcare in Bangladesh. J Pharm Pract and Res (2018)https://doi.org/10.1002/jppr.1401
  • Islam MA, Sabnis G, Farris F. The trilayer approach of teaching physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology concepts in a first-year pharmacy course: the TLAT model. Adv Physiol Educ. 2017 Sep 1;41(3):395-404, 2017.
  • Islam MA, Talukder R, Taheri R, and Blanchard, N. Integration of basic and clinical science courses in US PharmD programs. Am J Pharm Educ. 80 (10) Article 166, 2016.
  • Islam MA, Khan SA, Talukder RM. Status of Physiology Education in US Doctor of Pharmacy programs. Adv Physiol Educ. 2016 Dec; 40(4):501-508,
  • Islam MA, Chen G, and Talukder RM. Specialty Tracks in PharmD Curricula of US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. 8(6):774-781, 2016.
  • Islam MA, Khan SA, Gunaseelan S, and Talukder RM. Specialty education for student pharmacists and PharmD graduates in US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. 8:184-190,
  • Islam MA and Schweiger TA. Students’ Perception of an Integrated Approach of Teaching Entire Sequence of Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Pharmacotherapeutics Courses in PharmD Curriculum. Journal of Pharmacy Practice.  28(2):220-6, 2015.
  • Islam MA, Gunaseelan S, Talukder RM, Khan S. Current Challenges in Pharmacy Education in Bangladesh: A Roadmap for the Future. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. 6:730–735, 2014.
  • Islam MA, Gunaseelan S, Khan SA. A Research Elective Course on Dietary Supplements to Engage PharmD Students in Primary Literature Evaluation and Scholarly Activity. Journal of Pharmacy Practice 1-8 DOI: 10.1177/0897190013516510; 2014.
  • Islam MA, Schmidt RW, Gunaseelan S, Sanchez A. An Update on the Cardiovascular Effects of Quercetin, a Plant Flavonoid. Current Nutrition & Food Science 10:36-48, 2014.
  • Islam MA, Schmidt RW, Gunaseelan S, Sanchez A. An Update on the Cardiovascular Effects of Quercetin, a Plant Flavonoid. Current Nutrition & Food Science 10:36-48, 2014.
  • Islam MA. An Elective Course on the Basic and Clinical Sciences Aspects of Vitamins and Minerals. Am J Pharm Educ77: Article 17. 2013.
  • Downing L and Islam MA (corresponding author).The Use of Calcium Supplements and Cardiovascular Adverse Effects: An Update. Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 70:1132-1139, 2013.
  • Islam MA. Cardiovascular effects of green tea catechins: progress and promise. Recent Patents on Cardiovascular Drug Discovery 7: 88-99, 2012.
  • Islam MA. Soy Isoflavones and Cardiovascular Health: An Update. Current Nutrition and Food Science 7:108-121, 2011.
  • Islam MA. Pharmacological Modulations of Cardiac Ultra-rapid and Slowly Activating Delayed Rectifier Currents: Potential Antiarrhythmic Approaches. Recent Patents on Cardiovascular Drug Discovery, 5: 33-46, 2010.
  • DeSantiago J, Islam MA,Ziolo MT, Bers DM, and Pogwizd SM: Arrhythmogenic effects of beta2-adrenergic stimulation in the failing heart are due to enhanced SR Ca load. Circulation Research,
  • Despa S, Islam MA, Pogwizd SM, Bers DM: Intracellular [Na+] and Na+pump rate in rat and rabbit ventricular myocytes. J Physiol539: 133-143, 2002.
  • Despa S, Islam MA, Pogwizd SM, Bers DM: Intracellular Na+concentration is elevated in heart failure, but Na/K-pump function is unchanged. Circulation;105:2543-2548, 2002.
  • Kimura I, Islam MA, Ritsu H, Nojima H, Tezuka Y, and Zhao W: Blood pressure lowering, positive chronotropy and inotropy by the veratrum alkaloids germidine and germerine but negative chronotropy by veratridine in mice.   J Asian Natural Product Research, 2: 133-144, 2000.
  • Islam  MA, Nojima H, and Kimura I: Acetylcholne-induced biphasic effect on the maximum upstroke velocity of action potential in mouse isolated right atria: Interaction with b-adrenergic signaling cascade. Jpn J Pharmacol. 78: 181-190, 1998.
  • Islam MA, Nojima H, and Kimura I: Muscarinic M1receptor activation reducesmaximum upstroke velocity of action potential in mouse right atria. Eur J Pharmacol. 346: 227-236, 1998.
  • Chowdhury AKA, Islam MA, Rashid A, and Ferdous AJ: Therapeutic potential of the volatile oil of Nigellasativaseeds in monkey model with experimental shigellosis.  Phytotherapy Res. 12: 361-363, 1998.
  • Kimura I, Islam MA, Nojima H, Mizumoto J, Tezuka Y, Weijie Z: Blood pressure-lowering, positive chronotropic and inotropic effects of the veratrum alkaloids, germidine and germerine in mouse. J of Traditional Medicines, 15: 254-255, 1998.
  • Kimura I, Islam MA, and Kimura M: Potentiation by higenamine of the aconitine induced positive chronotropic effect in isolated right atria of mice: The effects of cholera toxin, forskolin and pertussis toxin. Biol Pharm Bull.  19: 1032-1037, 1996.
  • Kimura I, Islam MA, and Kimura M.: Cholera toxin accentuates the antagonism by acetylcholine of higenamine-induced positive chronotropy in isolated right atria of mice. Biol Pharm Bull.  18: 1509-11512, 1995.
  • Kimura I, Makino M, Takamura Y, Islam MA, and Kimura M: Positive chronotropic and inotropic effects of higenamine and its enhancing action on the aconitine-induced tachyarrhythmia in isolated murine atria. Jpn J Pharmacol. 66: 75-80, 1994.
  • Kimura I, Hata Y, Islam MA, and Kimura M: Diabetes mellitus-induced enhancement  of prostaglandin F2a-response is inhibited by lipoxygenase-but not cyclooxygenase-inhibitors in mesenteric veins and arteries of mouse and rat.  Jpn J Pharmacol. 64: 65-70, 1994.
  • Reza S, Khan OF, Islam MA, Rashid A, and Chowdhury AKA: In vitro antibacterial activity of Ipomoea fistulusa. Fitoterapia LXV: 465-466, 1994.
Dr. Suhui Yang

Suhui Yang, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Education

PhD, Chonnam National University, South Korea; MS Marine and Atmosphere Sciences, Stoney Brook University, NY; BS Oceanography (Major), Chemistry (Minor), Pukyong National University, South Korea.

Bio

Dr. Suhui Yang obtained her B.S. in Oceanography (major) and Chemistry (minor) from Pukyong National University, South Korea, in 2004 and her M.S. in Marine Chemistry from Stony Brook University, New York, in 2008. She later switched her interest to Medicinal Chemistry and earned her Ph.D. under the guidance of Prof. Won-Jea Cho from Chonnam National University, South Korea, in 2012. Her doctoral research was focused on the design and development of novel small molecule compounds targeting Androgen Receptor, Topoisomerase, or JAK/STAT pathway for treating cancers. In research, she used to apply computational techniques such as virtual screening or molecular docking, synthesize various chemical libraries, and optimize the active compounds.

Dr. Yang moved to the University of Michigan where she conducted research as postdoctoral fellow with Prof. Nouri Neamati, working on synthesis of bioactive small molecule compounds as anti-cancer agents (2013-2017). Dr. Yang joined the faculty of the American University of Health Sciences as an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, in August 2018. Her current research interests are the design and development of small molecule compounds as chemotherapeutic agents and the use of photoaffinity probes for identification of the molecular targets of small molecules.

Published Research

  • S. Yang, A. Shergalis, D. Lu, A. Kyani, Z. Lu, M. Ljungman, N. Neamati, “Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel Allosteric Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitors”, J. Med. Chem., just accepted.
  • A. Kyani, S. Tamura, S. Yang (co-first), A. Shergalis, S. Samanta, Y. Kuang, M. Ljungman, N. Neamati, “Discovery and Mechanistic Elucidation of a Class of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Glioblastoma”, Chem. Med. Chem., (2018), 13, 164.
  • K. Ramkumar, S. Samanta, A. Kyani, S. Yang, S. Tamura, L. Ziemke, J. Stuckey, S. Li, K. Chinnaswamy, H. Otake, B. Debnath, V. Yarovenko, J. Sebolt-Leopold, M. Ljungman, N. Neamati, “Mechanistic evaluation and transcriptional signature of a Glutathione S-transferase Omega 1 inhibitor”, Nature Comm., (2016), 7, 13084.
  • S. Yang, J. K. R., S. Lim, T. G. Choi, J.-H. Kim, S. Akter, M. Jang, H.-J. Ahn, H.-Y. Kim, M. P. Windisch, D. B. Khadka, C. Zhao, Y. Jin, I. Kang, J. Ha, B.-C. Oh, M. Kim, S. S. Kim, W.-J. Cho, “Structure-Based Discovery of Novel Cyclophilin A Inhibitors for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infections”, J. Med. Chem., (2015), 58 (24), 9546-9561.
  • C. Zhao, S. H. Yang, D. B. Khadka, Y. Jin, K.T. Lee, W.-J. Cho, “Computer-aided discovery of aminopyridines as novel JAK2 inhibitors”, Bioorg. Med. Chem., (2015), 23, 985-995.
  • D. B. Khadka, H. Woo, S. H. Yang, C. Zhao, Y. Jin, T. N. Le, Y. Kwon, W.-J. Cho, “Modification of 3-arylisoquinolines into 3,4-diarylisoquinolines and assessment of their cytotoxicity and topoisomerase inhibition”, Eur. J, Med. Chem., (2015), 92, 583-607.
  • H. T. M. Van, H. M. Jeong, D. B. Khadka, S. H. Yang, C. Zhao, Y. Jin, K. Y. Lee, Y. Kwon, W.-J. Cho, “Design, synthesis and systematic evaluation of cytotoxic 3-heteroarylisoquinolinamines as topoisomerases inhibitors”, Eur. J, Med. Chem., (2014), 82, 181-194.
  • 8. Y. Jin, D. B. Khadka, S. H. Yang, C. Zhao, W.-J. Cho, “Synthesis of novel 5-oxaprotoberberines as bioisosteres of protoberberines”, Tetrahedron Lett., (2014), 55, 1366-1369.
  • 9. S. H. Yang, C.-H. Song, H. T. M. Van, E. Park, D. B. Khadka, E.-Y. Gong, K. Lee, and W.-J. Cho, “SAR Based Design of Nicotinamides as a Novel Class of Androgen Receptor Antagonists for Prostate Cancer”, J. Med. Chem., (2013), 56, (8), 3414-3418.
  • 10. C.-H. Song, S. H. Yang (co-first), E. Park, S. H. Cho, Eun-Yeung Gong, D. B. Khadka, W.-J. Cho, and K. Lee, “Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Identification of a Novel AR Antagonist”, J. Biol. Chem., (2012), 287 (36), 30769-30780.
Hugo Arias

Hugo Arias, PhD, MS, BS

Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Education

PhD in Biochemistry, National Southern University, Argentina.

Bio

Hugo Arias obtained his Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1999 from National Southern University, Argentina. His Thesis was based on nicotinic receptors, developing this topic further in the following years. After his Thesis, Dr. Arias obtained a post-doc position at University of California, Riverside (1992-94), supported by a CONICET (National Scientific and Technical Research Council, Argentina) fellowship. When he returned to Argentina in 1994, Dr. Arias was appointed Assistant Investigator at CONICET, and subsequently promoted to Associate Investigator in 1999.

Research Areas of Interest

During 1999-02, he was a senior post-doc at Texas Teach University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock. In 2002, he obtained a Research Faculty position at University of Florida, Gainesville, and soon after he was appointed Assistant Professor at Western University Health Science, Pomona, CA. In 2007, Dr. Arias was promoted to Associate Professor at Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ. In 2012, he was promoted to Professor of Pharmacology and Biochemistry at California Northstate University College of Medicine, Elk Grove, and appointed Assistant Dean of Research in 2014. Dr. Arias is currently Professor in the proposed School of Pharmacy, American University of Health Sciences, teaching the courses “Pharmacology and Toxicology” and “Pharmacogenomics and Genetics”.

Dr. Arias started working on structural, functional, and neuropharmacological aspects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in 1983. He has amassed an impressive number of publications (>125), including peer reviewed papers, reviews, and book chapters, on this topic. His current focus is centred on neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases of high socioeconomic impact, including drug (and nicotine) addiction, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and cognitive dysfunctions. More particularly, I am interested in elucidating the role of different AChR subtypes in the underlying mechanisms of these conditions to further design novel ligands with high receptor selectivity for therapeutic translational opportunities. During the development of these projects, he had the opportunity of mentoring >100 undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate students from different programs in my lab as well as to advise students in their Master Theses, emphasizing his commitment with mentoring students in research. His collaborative mind opened the door for scientific collaborations with laboratories around the world, including laboratories from Italy, France, Austria, Poland, Hungary, Australia, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and USA.

Published Research

  • Wadenberg, M-L.G., Manetti, D., Romanelli, M.N., and Arias, H.R. (2017) Significance of the nicotinic α7 receptor in cognition and antipsychotic-like behavior in the rat. Behav. Brain Res. 333, 129-134.
  • Uspenska, K., Lykhmus, O., Gergalova, G., Chernyshov, V., Arias, H.R., Komisarenko, S., and Skok, M. (2017) Nicotine facilitates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor targeting to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to selective ligands. Neurosci. Lett. 656, 43-50.
  • Arias, H.R., Jin, X., Feuerbach, D., and Drenan, R.M. (2017) Selectivity of coronaridine congeners at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inhibitory activity on mouse medial habenula. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 92, 202-209.
  • Arias, H.R., Lykhmus, O., Uspenska, K., and Skok, M. (2018) Coronaridine congeners modulate mitochondrial α3β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with different potency and through distinct intra-mitochondrial pathways. Neurochem. Int. 114, 26-32.
  • Targowska-Duda, K.M., Kaczor, A.A., Jozwiak, K., and Arias, H.R. (2018) Molecular interactions of type I and type II positive allosteric modulators with the human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: an in silico study. J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. (29 pages) https://doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2018.1427634.
  • Arias, H.R., Feuerbach, D., and Ortells, M. (2018) Bupropion and (±)-SADU-3-72 inhibit human α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by luminal and non-luminal interactions. Neurotransmitter 5, e1631 (11 pages), doi: 10.14800/nt.1631.
  • Arias, H.R., Feuerbach, D., Schmidt, B., Heydenreich, M., Paz, C., and Ortells, M.O. (2018) Drimane sesquiterpenoids noncompetitively inhibit human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with higher potency compared to human α3β4 and α7 subtypes. J. Nat. Prod. 81(4), 811-817. doi: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00893.
  • Uspenska, K., Lykhmus, O., Arias, H.R., Pons, S., Maskos, U., Komisarenko, S., and Skok, M. (2018) Positive allosteric modulators of α7* or β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors trigger different kinase pathways in mitochondria. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 99, 226-235. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2018.04.018.
  • Arias, H.R., Vázquez-Gómez, E., Hernández-Abrego, A., Gallino, S., Feuerbach, D., Ortells, M.O., Elgoyhen A.B., and García-Colunga, J. (2018) Tricyclic antidepressants inhibit hippocampal α7* and α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by different mechanisms. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 100, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2018.04.017.
  • Targowska-Duda, K.M., Budzynska, B., Michalak, A., Jozwiak, K., Biała, G., and Arias, H.R. (2018) 3-Furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide, a highly selective positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic receptors, reduces anxiety-like behavior in mice. J. Psychopharmacol., in press, DOI: 10.1177/0269881118821100.h
Latifur Rahman

Latifur Rahman, MBBS

Assistant Professor, Medicine/Anatomy and Physiology

Education

MBBS (equivalent to US MD) (Chittagong Medical College, 1983), Surgical Intern (Chittagong Medical College, 1983-84), MS (Bangladesh Institute of Child Health,1991), Resident Medical Officer Dhaka Children’s Hospital, 1984-91, Attendant of Pediatric Surgical Unit Dhaka Children’s Hospital, 1991-93, Basic Life Support CPR Instructor American Heart Association, 2009-present

Bio

Dr. Rahman has been a faculty member at AUHS since 2016 where he currently teaches Anatomy & Physiology as part of the general education prerequisite for nursing students.

Since 2007, Dr. Rahman has been teaching Anatomy & Physiology as a senior and adjunct faculty member at local career and community colleges. He enjoys teaching because it allows him to share his knowledge and experience with students starting off in healthcare and has given him the opportunity to return to the field he has been devoted to. Dr. Rahman also brings experience from his medical background to AUHS. In Bangladesh, Dr. Rahman attended Chittagong Medical College where he obtained his MBBS ( MD equivalent) and later worked as a surgical intern. Dr. Rahman further specialized in Pediatric Surgery for which he obtained a MS (1991) from the Bangladesh Institute of Child Health at Dhaka University. After working as a Resident Medical Officer at Dhaka Children’s Hospital (1984-1991), Dr. Rahman soon became Attendant of the Pediatric Surgical Unit at this institution. In this capacity, Dr. Rahman was responsible for training and teaching resident medical officers’ skills pertaining to bedside medicine and surgery.

During his free time, Dr. Rahman likes to spend time with his family, garden, and stay busy with home improvement projects. Dr. Rahman was also an instructor for Basic Life Support and CPR training through the American Heart Association from 2009-2016. He is also an active member of a local philanthropic organization where he educates members on relevant healthy living topics.

Albert Nguessan Ngo

Albert Nguessan Ngo, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Education

Ph.D. University of Missouri Kansas-City, MO, USA
B.S, National Polytechnic Felix Houphouet Boigny, Yamoussoukro, Ivory Coast

Bio

Dr. Ngo serves as an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at American University of Health Sciences. He holds both a B.S and a PhD degree. He received his doctoral degree in pharmaceutical Science and chemistry from university of Missouri-Kansas City in May 2018 (UMKC). He also worked at UMKC as a postdoctoral research associate. During his years at UMKC, Dr. Ngo became skills in pharmaceutical data analysis, pharmaceutics, engineering material science, and biotechnology.

In addition, Dr. Ngo conducted research in drug delivery system such development of a topical anti-HIV/AIDS microbicide and development of safe and versatile oral delivery system for biopharmaceutics classification system class 2 and 4 drugs. Dr. Ngo has volunteered as an American Association Pharmaceutical Scientist (AAPS) abstract screener since 2017 and judged the 2017 Pharmaceutics Graduate Student Research meeting. In addition, Dr Ngo received many travel awards to present my work at international meetings. Dr. Ngo published 4 first authors articles including 3 peer reviewed research articles and one granted US patent as shown below.

Published Research

Research and areas of Interest
Develop Oral Delivery System for Therapeutic Macromolecules (e.g. Proteins and Nucleic Acid).
Extraction/ Synthesis of New Chemical Entities from Natural Plants for Cancer Therapies
Conduct research on homeless Empowering Learning Program, a health education and intervention program.

  • Ngo AN, Ezoulin MJ, Youm I, & Youan BB (2014) Optimal Concentration of 2,2,2-Trichloroacetic Acid for Protein Precipitation Based on Response Surface Methodology. J Anal Bioanal Tech 5(4).
  • Ngo AN, Ezoulin MJ, Murowchick JB, Gounev AD, & Youan BB (2016) Sodium Acetate Coated Tenofovir-Loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles for Improved Physico-Chemical Properties. Pharm Res 33(2):367-383
  • Patent, Inventors, Ngo NA, Bi-Botti C. Youan; Formulation for pharmaceutical agents, European patent (WO2016201213A1) and, U.S. patent, PCT US2016/036871, Application#62/173,772
  • Ngo AN, Danielle Thomas, James Murowchick, Navid J. Ayon, Archana Jaiswal, Bi-Botti “Celestin” Youan1Engineering Fast Dissolving Sodium Acetate Mediated Crystalline Solid Dispersion of Docetaxel (Accepted in, International Journal of Pharmaceutics 04/20/2018)
Balwantsinh Chauhan, MD, PhD

Balwantsinh Chauhan, MD, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences

Education

BSc, MSc and PhD from Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Baroda, Guj., India
MD degree in 1998 from College of Medicine, Spartan Health Sciences University (Vieux- fort, St. Lucia, West Indies)

Bio

Dr. Chauhan’s PhD work was in the field of ‘reproductive endocrinology’. Dr. Chauhan became faculty (Asst. Lecturer) in 1970 at Department of Zoology (Faculty of Science, M.S. University, Baroda) and was promoted to “ Reader (Associate Professor) ” in 1983. He left for U.S.A. in 1987, and got involved in biomedical research, then worked as Laboratory Manager and Lab. Director with environmental toxicology analytical laboratories. Dr. Chauhan’s primary interest is teaching courses like human/clinical anatomy, neuroanatomy, human embryology, medical physiology, pathophysiology, microbiology/immunology, medical genetics and pharmacogenomics.

In past, he taught at college of medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC, Chicago, U.S.A.), SABA school of Medicine (SABA, West Indies) and college of pharmacy, Roosevelt university, (Schaumburg, Illinois). His teaching experience spans over more than twenty-five years. Dr. Chauhan’s current research interests include: (1) Pharmacognosy: Screening of Indian, Chinese and plants from USA for their bio-medical properties, (2) Obesity,(3) Pharmacogenomics, and (3) Dermal-Toxicology/melanoma. Dr. Chauhan has co-authored several peer-reviewed publications and scientific abstract/ posters; some of them received international merit awards. He is also serving as reviewer for scientific manuscripts in his field of expertise. He is also a member in few scientific associations.